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Ekco T344 plus another one  

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crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin
Posted by: @helloekco

that's an impressive tech library

That's just the tip of the berg, I have so much I'm running out of space to store it all. As and when its requested I scan and load into the website's data library which currently holds about 9000 items at last count!! I can for the most part unless its rare or exotic, provide members with most of their data requirements.

dat1
dat2
dat3
servd
dat4
Posted by: @helloekco

Apologies for the confusion, what I meant was is "Television Explained" worth getting besides "Television Receiver Servicing" (both Spreadbury books).

Ah-ha I see, in that case it's entirely your choice, I've not read the other book but if its as good as his other one then why not treat yourself 👍

Crusty's Collection: Read the repair blogs
Crustys Youtube Channel: If you want to follow me on Youtube, please consider subscribing

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Posted : 18/01/2020 4:38 pm
helloekco
(@helloekco)
Busy V-Ratter Registered

@crustytv I had to smile at the similarities between those pics and my own "study"! I see you're into music (guitar?) too.

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Posted : 18/01/2020 4:44 pm
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
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I'd say "get both books".

Although my profession was at the other end of the television chain, even in the early 80s we were still taught some  valve theory and practical fault finding on valve equipment as some pockets of it still existed in the BBC back then (the MN6/501 television waveform monitor comes to mind, and a few AM8/4 audio power amplifiers ). However, some of the more interesting and esoteric stuff regarding television receiver circuitry I was unsure about and having picked up one of the two Spreadbury servicing books at a BVWS meeting, I found it an enjoyable read on the train to work and then searched out  the other volume. This helped me understand what's going on in a typical post-war valve TV set much more clearly.

One other concise little volume worth having is the Television Engineer's Pocket Book, originally edited by Pat Hawker - this ran to several editions into the 1990s I believe. The best version to get in your instance is probably the third edition, dating from 1960. I have all the editions of this useful book - including Pat Hawker's personal copy, no less....  🙂 AbeBooks has examples of this book at under a fiver, including postage.

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Posted : 18/01/2020 6:47 pm
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
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If you want to check out the contents of Television Engineers Pocket book you can download it from Archive.org, let you see what it’s like.

https://archive.org/details/TelevisionEngineersPocketBook

 

Frank

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Posted : 18/01/2020 9:22 pm
helloekco liked
helloekco
(@helloekco)
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@cathovisor Then I'll get both! Thanks for the recommendation.

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Posted : 18/01/2020 11:46 pm
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

@helloekco

You'll enjoy them. Websites like this are great - but I still prefer a book... 🙂 

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Posted : 19/01/2020 9:56 am
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

@helloekco

I would have uploaded them straight away for you but since my windows 10 has updated, now my A3 scanner wont work anymore. An A4 isn't quite big enough for the length of the Ekco sheets, they are about an inch more length than A4.

will work something out

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Posted : 19/01/2020 5:28 pm
helloekco
(@helloekco)
Busy V-Ratter Registered

@freya Thanks, there's no huge rush - it's much appreciated. The joys of perpetual Windows updates... we no longer have any control over how long our hardware goes before it's deemed obsolete.

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Posted : 19/01/2020 11:05 pm
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
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@helloekco

A situation Mac users have tolerated for years.... 

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Posted : 20/01/2020 9:30 am
helloekco liked
helloekco
(@helloekco)
Busy V-Ratter Registered

I just spent a tedious afternoon going through the service sheet for the T344, producing a component list covering the caps and resistors. My eyes hurt now... I will get the component list uploaded here when I've read how to do that.

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Posted : 26/01/2020 11:07 pm
helloekco
(@helloekco)
Busy V-Ratter Registered

I got the Television Explained book, it's a really good read. The second edition I believe, dated at just the right time for my Ekco sets, 1960.

I've stocked up on capacitors, my first job on the TV is to replace any known or very likely bad caps. The main electrolytic can has some leakage at the bottom, and I've discovered what was probably the cause of the smoke when I powered the set up months ago, there's a pair of wax caps on the front of the chassis, the top one has partially melted onto the bottom one.

One thing I'm unlikely to find is the correct mains power connector. Does anyone have any recommendations? It's got two round pins of differing sizes. I was thinking of making up a connector from a block of wood or perpex, drilled out, and containing two of those female connectors often used in car electrics (assuming I could get the correct sizes). I realise another option would be to dispense with the removable connector altogether and permanently solder a two core flex to the TV.

Skipping forward a bit, I've read that when powering up a set for the first time, it can be done with the EHT rectifier removed, to first check that the timebase etc is running. Does this pose any risk to the health of the LOPT?

A general question - what do people use exactly to discharge EHT from the tube. I've read about using an insulated screwdriver, but there are none that claim to insulate up to 15kv! How much risk of shock is there if only contacting the TV at one point (and also when running on an isolating transformer, not that that is relevant to the EHT which has its own).

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Posted : 30/01/2020 10:37 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

I have made up a couple of the mains plugs using the metal inserts from choc bloc connectors. These are available in the correct sizes for the pins on the mains connector, and you could use one of the screws  to attach the mains lead. These are moulded into resin to create the insulted plug.

For powering up the set, I always have used the directly powering method, its personal choice. If your sets have been kept in dry conditions then there is no reason why you should not power up with the EHT connected. It wont damage anything to disconnect the EHT rectifier. To discharge the EHT, short the EHT anode cap to chassis using a well insulated screwdriver or test lead. Even wear rubber gloves if your concerned. 

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Posted : 31/01/2020 1:38 pm
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

One of the biggest dangers of small BW CRT’s being left with a charge is dropping it whilst carry it. I only ever discharged the CRT if working in that area or replacing one.

 

Frank

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Posted : 31/01/2020 4:44 pm
helloekco
(@helloekco)
Busy V-Ratter Registered

Thanks both, that’s helpful.

I’ve been getting a bit paranoid about the tube implosion risk. I haven’t separated it from the chassis as it looks as though there is enough room to work on the front of the chassis (just). Should I be concerned about e.g. a droplet of hot solder contacting the back of the tube? I thought of covering it with a sheet while soldering.

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Posted : 31/01/2020 5:52 pm
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

The bulb area is quite strong, it’s the neck and pip under the base that are the weak points. Of course hit any part with a strong blow can cause much grief.

If you decide to handle the CRT, gloves and goggles are recommended. 

 

Frank

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Posted : 31/01/2020 6:18 pm
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