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B&W TV Making a 110 degree CRT extension cable

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irob2345
(@irob2345)
Posts: 584
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Topic starter
 

Extension cables are frequently useful when working on a chassis on the bench.

I'd managed to do without a 110 degree extension cable up until recently, but my HMV Y2 cannot readily be lifted onto the workbench (!) and, although the flip-down chassis provides excellent access, it means working on my knees. Not easy when you are trying to track down a multitude of niggly faults left by its previous mouse infestation. On the bench, though, the CRT base connector was just too short to reach my test CRT.

I like my extension cables to be rugged and reliable so I build them tough! No point trying to track down an intermittent caused by your test cables!

But where to get a 110 degree male plug? No removable bases on 110 degree CRTs, they are all glass.

So, I thought I'd call up a favour from the grandkids to whom I'd recently gifted a 3d printer.

I looked up the 21CEP4 datasheet and got the original RCA dimensions for the tube base.

I drew this up in the 3D footprint editor in Altium Designer (it's great for this kind of stuff), exported it as a step file and emailed it to their Dad, Adam.

I got a view emailed back of my plug in Fusion 360. Yep, that looks right!

CAD view

To keep everything dimensionally accurate and solid I added a PCB - very quick and inexpensive to do these days.

Pins needed to be 1mm diameter - we had nothing at work with that exact size. But Bunnings Warehouse came to the rescue with some nails (I had to buy 1000!) and some 7 core heavy duty trailer cable.

Some heatshrink and hot melt glue and an excellent Teletron socket donated by the same parts chassis that donated the LOPT for my Y2 project, and we are done!

A useful tip - when I fill the void between the heatshrink and the cable with hot melt, I put it in the freezer to set it quickly.

Oh, if anyone needs to duplicate my cable, I can post the 3d step file and the PCB gerbers.

 
Posted : 10/12/2023 8:10 am
ntscuser, slidertogrid, Lloyd and 2 people reacted
Doz
 Doz
(@doz)
Posts: 1535
Prominent Member Registered
 

Isn't that fusion 360? 

 
Posted : 10/12/2023 6:22 pm
irob2345
(@irob2345)
Posts: 584
Honorable Member Registered
Topic starter
 

Yes it sure is.

I used it 6 years back to design this:

Very good for sheet metal design.

The grandkids get it for free just by quoting their school ID.

 
Posted : 11/12/2023 7:38 am
Doz
 Doz
(@doz)
Posts: 1535
Prominent Member Registered
 

I was somewhat confused by your altium comment

 
Posted : 11/12/2023 7:59 am
irob2345
(@irob2345)
Posts: 584
Honorable Member Registered
Topic starter
 

Fair enough.

I use both Altium Designer (schematic and pcb design software) and Fusion 360.

My son and the grandkids also use Fusion 360.

I used Altium to make the Step file because it's quicker for making electronic part 3D footprints, and because it's what I use in my day job!

 
Posted : 12/12/2023 6:56 am
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