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pye ct222 Lego set

 
colourmaster
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Hi everyone
After the disaster with the Decca 100 this morning I thought that I would dig out my pye CT222 fitted with the 725 chassis . It was nicknamed the "Lego" set because of the design of the stand in line panels.
This one is stamped 1976 .
Never had much to do with them as we weren't pye dealers .
My aunt & uncle had the set model bought new in 1976 needing its first repair in 1983 when the tripler failed .
What memories do you all have of these sets .
Regards.
Gary.

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Topic starter Posted : 24/01/2015 5:18 pm
Till Eulenspiegel
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Hi Gary,
I wasn't a Pye dealer, however, I did take a good number of the Ekco badged version, the CT822. The sets weren't that bad but they all that good either. I far as I'm concerned these sets are best forgotten, like Winston Wolf says in the insurance advert "like it didn't happen".
There was always problems with the IF amplifier module and the firm LEDCO made a replacement which employed a SWAF instead of the original bandpass coils.
The power supply employed a BT106 thyristor to regulate the HT supply. A number of faults can occur like resistors going high and smoothing capacitor failure.
The set was essentially a 90 degree CRT version of the 26" CT266 which employed the Mullard A66-140X 110 degree delta CRT. The CT222 employed the A56-120X CRT.
So to sum up a set that was not all that special. the picture quality was OK though.

Till Eulenspiegel.

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Posted : 24/01/2015 5:40 pm
colourmaster
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Hi David
The pictures were never as good as the likes of the G8 CVC 5 etc .
They did converge well though .
Regards.
Gary

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Topic starter Posted : 24/01/2015 6:09 pm
Tazman1966
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When I was a lad living in South Wales, I remember them being sold very late on as new old stock in our local Currys. That would've been around early 1980. How they'd been hanging around for so long only they know! I remember them being significantly cheaper than anything else in the shop.

Tas

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Posted : 24/01/2015 6:10 pm
Till Eulenspiegel
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Flogged off for £199 in all the discounters. My shop never sold any Ekco CT822s, they were all rented. Actually, the customers quite liked the sets so perhaps these sets weren't all that bad after all.
Ekco became the wholesaler brand for Pye. The Invicta brand had disappeared in the mid seventies. no doubt it will return sometime on a junk LCD set.

Till Eulenspiegel.

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Posted : 24/01/2015 6:24 pm
malcscott
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I serviced hundreds of these sets while i worked for Rediffusion w/shop at Aycliffe. They inherited them when they took over Tates Television. I/f modules, triplers, 0.15 1kv caps, 39k resistors in the RGB o/p and the odd thick film. The h.t smoothing choke would pull itself from the psu pcb. The pbu gave trouble but easy to replace, the tubes (Mullard A56-120X) always outlasted the sets. A good all round set in my opinion. The 110 deg version was not as reliable. They used the quick start heater crt, Mullard A**-410X. Malc.

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Posted : 24/01/2015 6:44 pm
Till Eulenspiegel
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Hi Malc,
in a sense the faults were predictable and these sets could be fixed. Not like this LCD stuff we have these days.
The fact is it was sets like CT222 that kept folks in a job, so that was good.

Till Eulenspiegel.

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Posted : 24/01/2015 6:57 pm
slidertogrid
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I liked the 725 chassis and sold loads of the CT222 and CT223 secondhand, the 223 had a wood front similar in style to the PYE G11 and had a 6 button push button unit so lacked the tuner drawer of the 223. They lasted well and as others have said were fairly predictable and straightforward to fix when they did go wrong.
The 110 degree 731 I was not so keen on! :-o It seemed to pack up more often than the 90 degree chassis and when the A1 capacitor went short it often took the LOPT, Tripler and line output Transistor with it, One fault you had to watch was when one of the dropper sections failed, it would leave the smoothers charged just to wake you up!
Remember the coloured bulbs on the channel selector? pretty, but a questionable design...
:thumb
Rich

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Posted : 24/01/2015 8:05 pm
malcscott
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I now wish i had kept one of these for my collection. :bbd

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Posted : 24/01/2015 8:18 pm
ekcopyephilips
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Hi all

Ive got this very set at home and have the matching stand too. When i collected it i was expecting faults, but rather disappointingly not a single one. Everything works, even leaving it over a year in a damp shed then switching it on using full mains didn't phase it. I rather like it actually, after the mess that is the 697 chassis i think Pye put a lot of effort into getting their act together with this one.

One thing though, don't unplug panels without marking the plugs and their sockets with permanent pen. There are some panels where one plug will fit into 2 or 3 different positions, and unless you have the manual its impossible to put back together.

As a kid we had an Ecko badged 110 degree version dated 1973 and it lasted in use until it got to be about 17 years old. I then got my hands on it and really killed it - hence where i discovered not to unplug the panels. The convergence pots do burn up, but then so do they all on sets on 70's era. A lot of people hated the buzz from the large choke on the power supply, it is annoying and not much you can do about it.

Cheers

Mike

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Posted : 24/01/2015 9:11 pm
Rebel Rafter
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Hi, everyone, RR here. I never worked on a 725 but I remember that the 110 degree 741 was dreadfully unreliable. I think the chassis was primarily designed for 90 degree tubes and using the wide angle tubes overstretched it a bit. I remember stripping one and rebuilding it without the manual, I had to make a diagram of where all the connectors went, especially the earthing leads. I remember they had a rather fat little tuning drawer which used to cause all sorts of stupid problems, like rhythmic flickering of the picture. Also with the 26 inch one the plastic mouldings for holding the tube in place at the top used to break off and I had to make some little U-shaped brackets which I fastened in with some 4BA bolts and fitted the tube onto them. RR.

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Posted : 25/01/2015 3:38 pm
ntscuser
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Wasn't there a Pye or EKCO stereo system with similar 'Lego' styling or did I imagine it?

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Posted : 27/01/2015 1:38 am
Doz
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I had the woody version of that when I was 14 or 15 years old. My first colour set. Attemped to couple video in from my home computer (a CBM 64) with scant regard for mains isolation was an interesting and very steep learning curve!

Went down with a thermal no colour fault a few years after that, by which time I'd got a bit more knowledge. There was a cap on the decoder at fault. Eventually tripler failure killed it. I was working in the trade by then, so a nice 20" TX9 "Stereo" set replaced it.

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Posted : 27/01/2015 3:20 pm
Till Eulenspiegel
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Remind me. Were the convergence controls the usual wirewound high wattage types? Or did the CT222 employ low wattage potentiometers which controlled convergence coil driver transistors. The method used in the Thorn 8800 series.

Till Eulenspiegel.

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Posted : 27/01/2015 4:49 pm
malcscott
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Most of the convergence pots were low wattage types.

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Posted : 27/01/2015 4:52 pm
Till Eulenspiegel
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Picture taken from the 1978 Philips television brochure. The 20" model 655.

Till Eulenspiegel.

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Posted : 12/02/2015 7:04 pm
Doz
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I had one of those too... G11 with the anode cap in the corner. Break out the duraglit for the channel change!

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Posted : 12/02/2015 8:13 pm
crustytv
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Picture taken from the 1978 Philips television brochure. The 20" model 655.

Till Eulenspiegel.

Hi David,

Not sure if you seen my attempt to document early colour TV (67 - early 80s) and in particular brochures. Have a look on the main site at https://www.radios-tv.co.uk on the right-hand side you will see a section called" British Colour TV's" lots of colour sets from 67 onwards.

I placed a wanted ad on the forum here viewtopic.php?f=10&t=8011 Don't know If you've seen it or have anything knocking about in your shop. I'm Looking for brochures from the 70's - early 80's covering colour. If you do, any that I could borrow to scan would be greatly appreciated. I'm desperate for anything Decca as I have a huge gap in the model range.

For starters that 78 Philips brochure would be a good candidate.

Have a look at the website and see if you have anything I don't have already.

Chris

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Posted : 12/02/2015 8:26 pm
crustytv
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Nice little development here.

Today I received a brochure from Jon Evans, for the very set under discussion here. It came from PYE's chief development engineer, a chap called John Davies. Jon had been in conversation with him and the brochure was passed on.

John Davies is represented on the brochures first page wearing the green tie. Have a look here https://www.radios-tv.co.uk/?q=PYE scroll to the bottom to find the PYE CT 222 " A Unique Colour TV, A Unique Story"

Nice to know these guys are still with us.

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Posted : 14/02/2015 9:00 pm