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Transporting CRT Tubes

 
mendipviews
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What do members think is the safest way of transporting CRT Tubes. Reason I ask is on a recent house clearance I have come across several round CRT Tubes hidden in the loft, these were carefully put in the garage of property pending collection.

Today I decided to photograph the tubes so I had a list of models and one promptly imploded in its box scaring the absolute wits out of me, I am thinking temperature change must of caused it to go as it wasn't disturbed, touched or I just looked at it wrong.

I am thinking to transport these back home the safest would be to wrap them in a blanket then box them individually..... Your thoughts please

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Topic starter Posted : 04/04/2018 3:31 pm
Cathovisor
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Seems about right to me, but temperature change? Think about how much of a temperature change there is inside the average TV set from cold.

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Posted : 04/04/2018 3:33 pm
crustytv
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Posted by: mendipviews

Today I decided to photograph the tubes so I had a list of models and one promptly imploded in its box scaring the absolute wits out of me, I am thinking temperature change must of caused it to go as it wasn't disturbed, touched or I just looked at it wrong.

I would think temperature played a great part. I have about 6+ B&W CRT's in the loft and am S**T scared to move them down into the warm house, wish I never got them or put them up there. I think the best time to move them is when there's less of a variance but the thought of handling through a loft hatch fills me with dread....bang and your face is on the ceiling.

I keep my colour tubes in the TV display room at a constant temperature.

 

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Posted : 04/04/2018 3:35 pm
crustytv
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Posted by: Cathovisor

Seems about right to me, but temperature change? Think about how much of a temperature change there is inside the average TV set from cold.

Yes but in a TV set it never goes -ve 6-10 which is what we've been getting recently would this intense thermal cycling over a period of many years not have some bearing? 

Luke out of interest, did the box contain the implosion? Did it breach any of the box? I've often wondered if a cardboard box is just false hope. Some early tubes used to have a mesh sock.

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Posted : 04/04/2018 3:40 pm
mendipviews
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Posted by: Chris

Luke out of interest, did the box contain the implosion? Did it breach any of the box? I've often wondered if a cardboard box is just false hope. Some early tubes used to have a mesh sock.

It was in its original box but with the top open as I was going to meter the heater pins for continuity, it was sat on the bench in the garage as I had about half hour previously carried it out of the loft.

Turned around talking to the customer then suddenly big ka-boom, the box contained the glass which was a good thing as there was six more round tubes next to the box.

It was a brimar tube if anybodies wondering.

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Topic starter Posted : 04/04/2018 3:59 pm
crustytv
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Very lucky escape Luke and goes to show we must at all times treat these old tubes with extreme caution. No matter how stupid we feel, wear gloves, full face protection and a thick padded coat. 

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Posted : 04/04/2018 4:03 pm
mendipviews
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Posted by: Chris

Very lucky escape Luke and goes to show we must at all times treat these old tubes with extreme caution. No matter how stupid we feel, wear gloves, full face protection and a thick padded coat. 

Too true Chris, I had visions of the crt neck stuck in my eye ? 

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Topic starter Posted : 04/04/2018 4:47 pm
PYE625
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I read somewhere that glass cold-flows and strain will eventually cause it to break. Quite different, but apparently if a pane of glass is held on a bench and the one half is overhanging with a small weight applied, it will eventually break at the point of overhang.

CRT glass is perhaps a bit different, but some early crt's had quite thin glass, say compared with later types.

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Posted : 04/04/2018 5:09 pm
PYE625
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As already suggested, I can think of no better way than to have each crt wrapped securely in suitably sized old towels or blankets, then each in it's own box, to contain the implosion if it occurs. Furthermore, if in transit, a duvet or thick covering over the lot too. This would also help muffle the sound as it would be very distracting whilst driving to say the least.

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Posted : 04/04/2018 5:45 pm
Terry
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These are round tubes which are the most fragile of all, although saying that, I salvaged a 14" rectangular tube in my  early teens from a set I scrapped and 'stored' it behind the head of my bed. - many months later it spontaneously imploded but, fortunately, I was not there at the time!

Anyway, back to the plot - transporting these tubes safely. We know the one that imploded was in its box - I assume the original manufacturer's packing - which, despite being open at the top, has contained the glass. In other words, the packing fulfilled its function.

So, in essence, you have already answered the question. Are all the other CRTs in manufacturer's packing? If so, the safest way to transport them is in the sealed boxes. If not, find suitable boxes or adapt others of similar or greater thickness of card to replicate the manufacturer's packing.

I watched two rail-men, many years ago, tossing loads of Mullard tubes out of a parcels van onto the platform. There was no evidence of any tubes imploding but these were, of course, brand new. But what I'm pointing to here is that Mullard and other manufacturers designed their packing for the contents to endure the harshest of handling whilst protecting anybody in the vicinity if anything did happen. 

To quote the old saying: if it ain't broke, don't fix it!

Obviously, how you handle the tubes out of their packaging is an entirely different manner.

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Posted : 04/04/2018 7:48 pm
mendipviews
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Thanks for the replies so far everyone, I have left them to acclimatize in the garage for a few days with a view to moving to the workshop over the weekend.

Indeed most are still in the original manufactures boxes but there are four loose which I will wrap and box for the move including a large silvered emiscope 3/13 which looks quite fragile, best dig out the face mask and gloves

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Topic starter Posted : 04/04/2018 9:07 pm
PYE625
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Posted by: mendipviews

best dig out the face mask and gloves

I would. Once bitten, twice shy as they say.

Thank goodness you were not peering over the box taking a measurement at the time.

Whilst at it, could it be worth examining the others for any cracks or possible defects? 

 

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Posted : 04/04/2018 9:13 pm
peterscott
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I think rapid temperature change can cause implosion. Some years ago Darius / oldeurope reported a tube imploding over night in his cellar for no obvious reason. I guess it might have been temperature gradient from the cold floor in was sitting on. https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/showthread.php?t=5505&highlight=imploded

Peter

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Posted : 05/04/2018 9:01 am
Terry
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Temperature change most definitely wasn't a factor in the case of the implosion I referred to in my previous post.

I was at my weekly scout meeting at the time, so I only found out about it when I got home. My mum  and my brother had been watching TV in the room directly beneath my bedroom when they heard a loud bang from overhead followed by the clattering caused by some of the pieces of glass landing on the floor - obviously they didn't hear the bits that landed on my bed!

The tube was probably an MW36-24 which, at the time, could hardly be described as vintage!

It occurs to me that these tubes were invariably mounted in sets using a metal band around the edge of the faceplate, very similar to the later development of the implosion proof Rimguard tube so, is it possible that it wouldn't have imploded if it had still been installed in a TV?

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Posted : 05/04/2018 10:26 am
Boater Sam
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I worked at Ferranti on tube R&D in the '60s, imploded lots of tubes without injury and we had no special clothing, just goggles.

The monster radar plotter tubes were a bit frightening,  test implosion with a pointed weight into the armoured faceplate did throw glass about a bit.

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Posted : 05/04/2018 5:24 pm
Katie Bush
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Posted by: peterscott

I think rapid temperature change can cause implosion. Some years ago Darius / oldeurope reported a tube imploding over night in his cellar for no obvious reason. I guess it might have been temperature gradient from the cold floor in was sitting on. https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/showthread.php?t=5505&highlight=imploded

Peter

Well, It's generally acknowledged that a rapid change in temperature can cause a chipped vehicle windscreen to break...

Given the likelihood of imperfections in early CRTs, it would seem likely that these too could cause the glass to fracture, but with far more dramatic results because of the air pressure difference between inside and out of the envelope.

Also, I seem to recall reading somewhere that as it ages, glass becomes "harder" (more brittle) and as such less tolerant of anything that would cause even the tiniest amount of distortion/change of shape to the envelope - warming one side of the CRT more the other could produce just such a distortion.

Just proffering a suggestion or two.......

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Posted : 05/04/2018 8:57 pm