Notifications
Clear all

Rhetorical Question: Are Old TV's Going to get Banned as a Result

 
crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin
Posts: 11044
Openreach chief engineer

We'd just advise the public to make sure that their electric appliances are properly certified and meet current British standards..

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54239180

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 22/09/2020 7:07 am
Topic Tags
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 4199

@crustytv

I don’t know the type of broadband but if ADSL2/VDSL it can be disturbed by many sources of signals. 

Personal opinion, it was a fudge to get better speeds than dial up but should have been retired many years ago, I feel it’s going to be with us for many more years.

Back to the article.

There up is a thread over on UKVRRR about this BBC article, I stated old could be anything over 10 years in today’s thoughts.

Oh dear, it’s not 8am and I sound like a grumpy old man, perhaps I am. ? 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/09/2020 7:50 am
helloekco liked
turretslug
(@turretslug)
Honorable V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 528

I think governments of any flavour are wary of "banning" items of private domestic ownership- OK, increasingly severe restrictions on firearms ownership have been imposed over the years, but there was an obvious and direct lethality connection, and a privately-owned car can fail MoT testing and be illegal to use from that point of view- but old appliances and the electro-magnetic intereference that they may or may not produce is less tangible and definitive in its effect on the everyday life of most people. "An Englishman's home is his castle" and all that.

With any news item, I like to say, "Before you jump up and down at the story, look for the story behind the story".... My suspicion runs along the lines that in many rural areas, improving broadband from "marginal" to "decent" is relatively expensive and difficult, so blame the little man rather than cough up for the improvement investment. If a bit of "greenwash" guilt can be daubed around the story, even better- it's the fault of someone with an old and ergo inefficient appliance, so there's a bit more impetus for everyone else to feel impelled to go and buy a new TV in the absence of specific prohibition legislation.

Just the impression of a jaded old git.... ? 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/09/2020 11:37 am
Alex728
(@alex728)
Trusted V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 122

Openreach claimed to have already replaced much the cabling in the village before discovering interference from this chaps TV set (so ironically he may have done people a favour in the long run!) 

TBH I'd suspect a poor SMPSU in a 90s/2000s era set much more than anything vintage as many collectors also work on and listen to radio (for music broadcasts) and/or are amateur radio enthusiasts as well as having some interest in wider technology so would have noticed any QRM from their own equipment (and maybe experimented by checking it the broadband issue appeared and disappeared when something in their workshop was powered on and off).

In the same way people who drive older classic cars or ride vintage bicycles tend to maintain them well and remain safe on the roads (even though older vehicles are MOT exempt and bicycles don't have formal testing (although there are legal obligations and common sense suggests that they should be safe!))

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/09/2020 1:06 pm
Alex728
(@alex728)
Trusted V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 122

According to the Daily Mail, who appear to have identified the elderly couple who owned the TV and 'encouraged' them to talk to the Press (they were trying to avoid publicity) the set is described as a second hand 16 inch Bush TV they bought for £30, and which they have since put in a skip at their son's house (where he is having building work done)

I don't think it is a vintage set (for one thing it woudn't receive Freeview without an external decoder) but one of these... (I don't know how recent they are, but indeed likely to be only 10 or so years old..)

bush tv 5cc32ec061836e097f70624d

 

 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/09/2020 8:31 pm
Doz
 Doz
(@doz)
Noble V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 1339

That bastion of superb british journalism , "The Sun" (tongue firmly in cheek) reveled the set to be a Bush 16" with built in DVD ... so not "vintage" as we would describe it. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/09/2020 4:36 pm
Nuvistor, Alex728, Cathovisor and 1 people liked
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 5566

@alex728

Is the bog roll next to the set a comment?

They've now been interviewed by Piers Morgan too.

Like many on here, I don't call that telly 'old'. And yet when I made a visit to the tip the other day, the telly container was just panels... no CRTs.

A mate of mine was having issues with AM reception on his fancy Icom IC-7300 recently; it turned out to be his central heating pump, in which a mains filter had been omitted at manufacture. Fitting said filter reduced the QRM to zero.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/09/2020 7:42 pm
Alex728 liked
Katie Bush
(@katie-bush)
Famed V-Ratter Moderator
Posts: 4885

As the neighbour stated, the couple were away on holiday last month, and the problem was still in evidence during their absence, plus, even with the telly being dumped, the problem is still present, and at times, worse, since the engineers had been. One engineer, interviewed on BBC News, spluttered out some bovine deposit about the older television set inducing a high voltage in the broadband wiring, which in turn causes instability - err, pardon? From the pictures, the telly would have been about 40ft at least from the street cabinet, so it would have to be some heavy duty EMF from that tiny little telly!

I had to check my calendar, and it is definitely not April 1st!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/09/2020 10:27 pm
turretslug
(@turretslug)
Honorable V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 528

Well, there's a thing.... It's almost as if they were a little hasty in pointing the finger of blame. I suppose we've all had days when we thought, that's fixed it!- and then the fault came back to leave egg on our face but at least we hadn't made it to the national press in the meantime. As nuvistor pointed out earlier, data-over-the-existing-landline was a get-by kludge that fortuitously worked thanks to physics but it's all too often on a bit of a wing and a prayer and easily upset.

I wonder who'll get blamed next.... Too many people using electric toothbrushes? ? 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/09/2020 11:41 pm
Boater Sam
(@boater-sam)
Reputable V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 420

Eee, well I never!

I have the same TV, it works fine, the MiFi in the boat works fine, they are 6 feet apart inside a steel Faraday cage.

BT/OpenRetch are talking small round objects.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/09/2020 9:29 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 5566
Posted by: @turretslug

Well, there's a thing.... It's almost as if they were a little hasty in pointing the finger of blame. I suppose we've all had days when we thought, that's fixed it!- and then the fault came back to leave egg on our face but at least we hadn't made it to the national press in the meantime.

Oh, don't I know that one so well - "as ashes in the mouth" is the best description when it happens.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/09/2020 11:50 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 5566

Well, I've seen some BS come out of BBC News but this just has to take the biscuit: from the quiz of the week's news at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-54264549 -

"Devices with electrical components - from fairy lights and model trains to phone chargers - can interfere with domestic broadband, as can timed devices such as central heating and, presumably, vintage teasmades."

(Forgive me, I couldn't see how to indicate the above as a quote.)

I despair.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/09/2020 11:10 am
Doz
 Doz
(@doz)
Noble V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 1339
Posted by: @cathovisor

Well, I've seen some BS come out of BBC News but this just has to take the biscuit: from the quiz of the week's news at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-54264549 -

"Devices with electrical components - from fairy lights and model trains to phone chargers - can interfere with domestic broadband, as can timed devices such as central heating and, presumably, vintage teasmades."

(Forgive me, I couldn't see how to indicate the above as a quote.)

I despair.

Never let the truth get in the way of a good story.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/09/2020 11:28 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 5566

Do you remember the days when BT only guaranteed your telephone line for speech and using it for the Internet was very much a secondary issue?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/09/2020 11:38 am
Alex728 liked
Katie Bush
(@katie-bush)
Famed V-Ratter Moderator
Posts: 4885

@cathovisor

I do, and I remember overclocking my old modem up to 19200 baud (I think it was rated for 9600), if my memory hasn't farted into my earhole (It's a long time since I was on dial-up!), but whatever the numbers, that old modem was working well above its rated data rate, and it took it admirably as did the old copper wire telephone lines. I also remember I tried the next step up, but it was not having any of that.

Then broadband came alone and the rest, as they say, is history!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/09/2020 3:55 pm
turretslug
(@turretslug)
Honorable V-Ratter Registered
Posts: 528

What's in these "vintage teasmades" that interferes with domestic broadband- mercury thyratrons?

I suppose we're all used to newspapers being full of ill-informed and half-baked drivel on technical subjects but I'm sure I'm not getting too rose-tinted by thinking that in past times the BBC would have at least got hold of someone with relevant qualification to give a useful, if necessarily light-weight, and accurate over-view of what was going on.

It had been suggested on another forum that this sort of kerfuffle might lead to pressure on manufacturers to improve EMC performance of their goods, but I think it's more likely to increase suspicion of anyone who resists being drawn into rapid-turnover consumerism- "it must be their fault, that odd bloke who collects old radios etc", pitchforks and flaming torches at the ready. I can't help thinking that the authorities regard much EMI hassle from inadequately-filtered appliances as "too difficult" and domestic broadband as a fading technology with low-clout users.

The "Naylor Hammond, BSc" skit that periodically appeared in the satirical magazine Viz lampooning the self-appointed know-alls who write technical articles in the popular press pretty much summed it up for me;

"Radar- a type of army television that allows submarines to charge their batteries underwater".

(N.B. for the uninitiated- if you're easily offended, Viz isn't for you....)

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/09/2020 4:30 pm
Katie Bush
(@katie-bush)
Famed V-Ratter Moderator
Posts: 4885
Posted by: @turretslug

"Radar- a type of army television that allows submarines to charge their batteries underwater".

Well that's a bugger! What about aeroplanes? Do they have to go underwater too?!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/09/2020 8:35 pm