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Music & Media Formats Favourite original vinyls

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sideband
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Typing this as I'm listening to an original 1973 pressing of Pink Floyds' Dark Side Of The Moon. Still sounds as fresh as the day it was released 50 years ago!!. Previously listened to Renaissance 'Ashes Are Burning' also original 1973. It amazes me just how good these vinyls were (are)...and these have been played a lot. Originally on a Garard 401 with SME arm and Shure V15 mkIII, now on a much less elaborate deck...a Marantz TT275 direct drive with an Audio Technica AT85EP cartridge tracking at 1.5gm. I've always taken great care of vinyls and this obviously paid off in the early days. There are a few very minor noises but by and large they still sound as good as the day they were bought. 

There must be quite a few who still have favourite vinyl albums whatever genre you prefer. I have to say that I also like certain Classical types and I have a superb recording (1984) on Deutsche Grammophon of Widor Organ Symphony No.5 in F minor that really makes the floorboards rattle when the organist hits the bass pedals! The same can be said for Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor that is on an original Philips (1972) album. I just found that one tucked in with Deep Purple!

So who else has still got and listens to, original favourite vinyl albums from 50 odd years ago?

 
Posted : 03/01/2023 9:47 pm
WayneD reacted
WayneD
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Lou Reed's Transformer, the 1972 pressing. It just seems to transport you to early 1970s New York. 

I have a 1978 pressing of Jeff Wayne's War of the Worlds as well as a 1990s CD copy. The CD is unplayable due to bitrot. The vinyl is still fine.

Are we allowed to mention new releases on vinyl? If so, Concretism. The 2018 release "For Concrete and Country" and 2021's Teliffusion. I made a music video for a track from Teliffusion using the vinyl fed directly into my PC:

 
Posted : 03/01/2023 10:36 pm
Cathovisor
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When did we start calling LPs "vinyls"?

 
Posted : 03/01/2023 11:33 pm
sideband
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Posted by: @cathovisor

When did we start calling LPs "vinyls"?

Some younger people don't understand 'LP'! Blame Philips and Sony who jointly developed the CD format! It seems that 'vinyl' has become the substitute for LP so that the distinction between CD or MP3 is clearer. Afraid to say that I tend to use 'vinyl' rather than LP since it seems to be immediately understood by everyone despite growing up with 'LP's and 'records'.

 

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 8:20 am
Cathovisor
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Posted by: @sideband

Some younger people don't understand 'LP'!

To which my answer is "so educate them."

Dear God, whatever next? "Shellacs" (no doubt with a 'k' in there somewhere)?

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 8:33 am
slidertogrid
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Posted by: @cathovisor

When did we start calling LPs "vinyls"?

The same decade as "replacing" became "swapping out" dismantling or breaking for spares became "Parting out" sentences starting "So" and the overuse of the word "basically". Oh and don't forget to use the word "Like" a couple of times per paragraph..  "So, Basically, like, I was standing at the bus stop, like...." 

I use the term L.P or album when speaking to older friends and L.P Record if I think L.P may not be understood.  The media seem to refer to any records as vinyl. I saw an antiques expert describing a portable gramophone as a vintage record player that played the "old vinyls" I think it may have been Dickenson's real deal. she didn't even realise what she was looking at was in fact a genuine antique (for a change). 

 

 

 

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 9:31 am
WayneD
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I first heard the term "vinyl" in the early 90s when CDs first outsold LPs and I remember Woolworths selling off vinyl in a "Four vinyl LPs for a fiver" sale.

I hate the term "vinyls" though, I thought the word vinyl itself was a plural. Same with "Legos" it's Lego FFS! We don't say sheeps we say sheep.

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 1:32 pm
Cathovisor
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Posted by: @slidertogrid

dismantling or breaking for spares became "Parting out"

That one comes from the States: I used to see that in Antique Radio Classified towards the end of the 90s.

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 1:32 pm
Cathovisor
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Posted by: @wayned
I thought the word vinyl itself was a plural.

Nope - it's an abbreviation of polyvinyl chloride.

 

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 1:36 pm
Lloyd
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I pinched my dad’s copy of David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust and the spiders from Mars, that’s an original from the 70’s! Still sounds good, despite being thrashed on many cheap decks over the years, unlike his copy of Bad Company which looked like it had been stabbed with a flat blade screwdriver! I managed to even out the dent by carefully warming it up, so it began to re shape itself, it now plays ok, just with some pop noises as it goes over the damage. I also pinched my Mum’s copy of Enya’s Watermark, which is from either 1988 or 89, while the music sounds fine, the quiet bits sound like the stylus is being dragged through a sandpit! This record has barely been played, and even after cleaning it still sounds the same, the same album on tape has less noise!! Must be a bad pressing..

I also have a fair few modern albums on vinyl, my favourite of all time being AFI’s Sing the Sorrow from 2003, I bought the double gatefold LP on red translucent vinyl, it sounds great, it only cost me £20 back in 2006 (I got the CD in 2003!), I had a look recently on eBay and was shocked to see some listed for over £1K! I haven’t played it since… 

I have a few different turntables, Technics SL-5 is a direct drive linear tracking thing, it’s not bad, but it starts to sound a bit yuck towards the middle of a disc. The Sony PS-Q7 is pretty good, sounds good all through to the end, but is useless with warped records! It’s also a direct drive machine, but with an L shaped arm. I also have one of those Sharp VZ-3500 vertical machines that plays both sides, it did sound good, but it’s playing slow now, I think the motor bearings are shot, it was refusing to rotate when I got it, but seemed ok after putting a drop of oil on it. Then there is the Bush SRP-31D, still going strong! I don’t play anything expensive on that though..

Regards,

Lloyd

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 1:53 pm
slidertogrid
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I am similar to Lloyd in so much as the condition of the record and how much I value it depends on what I play it on. I am not too fussy about most of my record collection with a few exceptions. I have a Dansette Hi-Fi (LOL) which I use mainly for 78s, pop singles and older common nothing special LPs. I have a top of the range Toshiba from 1977 which was the first music centre I heard Pink Floyd on it is in mint condition and sounds as good as it needs to for me. That I play everything else on.

I bought The wall on the day of release I pre-ordered it and paid for it in advance of the release day which I think was a Friday. (May have been a Saturday I remember taking the day off work) This I was advised to do by the record shop owner as he said by doing so I could avoid the queue they would have a counter open on the day for pre-paid collections. I thought at the time that it was a gimmick as I didn't think there were that many Floyd fans around locally...

On the day the queue went down the road ! I went to the collection counter showed my receipt and headed home on my FS1E with it tucked safely in my jacket.

Considering the amount it was played and the amount of teenage parties it went to the records are in exceptional condition. the sleeve however has aged, yellowed and is a bit tatty. However about five years ago I was presented with The Wall and Wish You were here by a friend who had bought them new an kept them in the original Cellophane sleeves, he had simply slit the end removed the record played them once to record them and then put them away. The gatefold sleeve of The wall has never seen the light of day since it was made and all of the stickers and posters are still in Wish you were here as new. I looked after my records but not as carefully as that! They have been played a few times in my ownership but only on the Tosh with care! 

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 3:11 pm
Pye Man
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Posted by: @cathovisor

When did we start calling LPs "vinyls"?

After we started calling them “albums”!

An LP was 32s 6d.

An album was £2.50

No idea how much a vinyl is!

 

Nick

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 3:14 pm
sideband
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No idea how much a vinyl is!

 

 

...about £25....at least that is how much I saw Abbey Road by The Beatles being sold for in HMV Bromley last year.....In comparison, the CD of Abbey Road was £10...

 

 
Posted : 04/01/2023 6:57 pm
Pye Man
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My favourite original classical LP is Holst’s The Planets – BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargeant. It is on the Classics For Pleasure label and I got it from the record shop near the dentist after taking an afternoon off from school for the appointment. Always seemed a very good pressing for a budget label. (Nipping out from school in lunch break to buy a pop, rock or soul LP was okay as you could show off your purchase (though you would get some sneers from non-believers at the soul stuff) but it was always wise to buy ‘uncool’ classical on the way home.)

Around this time of year an LP called Winter Sunshine gets a spin. When I was a kid and we first had a record player – a Philips AG4000 which ran off six U2 batteries and proved a boon in the power cuts of the early 70s – my mother joined the World Record Club who produced budget LPs. Some of these were covers of songs from shows and a lot were easy listening with the occasional collection of (dreadful) covers of recent pop hits that are sometimes collectors items because an unknown Reg Dwight (Elton John) or other yet to be famous musician played on them. Winter Sunshine features Christmas songs and tunes but with a jazz interpretation. My mother was very disappointed in it as she hoped for traditional performances but I loved it and played it again and again. I must have been disposed to jazz at an early age and explains my enjoyment of it now. Fortunately, despite its titchy platter the AG4000 featured a good stylus and cartridge and records played on this player have fared better than those played on the later Dansette type player. Winter Sunshine always brings back wonderful childhood memories. With everyone now gone Christmas is always tinged with a little sadness.

Another WRC pressing is an LP of The Seekers recordings featuring Judith Durham and made before they became famous. Again mother was a bit disappointed in this as she rather thought there might be some hits on it. They are mainly folk type songs so I didn’t care for it much when I was young but have played it a lot in recent times. Judith Durham had one of the greatest voices ever and was a sad loss in 2022 (as was schoolboy crush Olivia Newton-John – still have the poster!).

My other favourites are three Music for Pleasure LPs of Frank Sinatra recordings. I bought these from Woollies for about a quid a go when I was still at or just left college. (I was already growing out of pop music – especially chart stuff – and had left Radio One for Radio 2.) The best is Sinatra Swings and has lots of his Nelson Riddle recordings. By this time I had built a deck with a Sugden Connoisseur BD1 turntable kit, SAU2 arm and Shure M75ED cartridge. The plinth I made in the college workshop and my father, who for a while in his youth had been a cabinet maker, finished it with stain and varnish. I restored it a few years ago and is currently the deck I use with my hifi set up but now with a 1980s Nagaoka cartridge.

So it turns out my favourite ‘vinyls’ are all budget label pressings!

Nick

 
Posted : 05/01/2023 12:00 am
Pye Man
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Before putting my Winter Sunshine LP away I gave it a run on my 1963 Philips AG4656 portable record player a run. It is unmolested, down to being originally sold in Holland and is complete with original continental plug, and I am always amazed how well it plays and how good it sounds given that the speaker is housed in the detachable clip on lid and has no back box. However, with the top of the small platter only marginally higher than the deck I have to avoid playing any LP that might be more than slightly warped lest it scrape any of the heads of the fixings of the deck.

Philips made a lot of portable players and this one is probably one of the last to come with valves and has a nice reassuring glow through the ventilation grills.

Nick

 
Posted : 07/01/2023 10:01 am
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sideband
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One original record that gets an airing most Christmases is 'Christmas with Bert Kaempfert'. It's just become a bit of a tradition since the record has been in my family since it was first bought in 1965. I think it was the first stereo record I heard since my late older brother had hooked up a second amplifier to the mono radiogram we were using at the time. He'd fitted an Acos stereo cartridge and then  wired it all up with an extra speaker....far from hi fi but we thought it sounded pretty amazing at the time. We kept that lash-up going for several years and when The Beatles released 'Revolver' in 1966 we bought the stereo version (you could buy mono or stereo versions in those days) which unfortunately I don't have any more....at least not on vinyl. 

Whenever I play the Bert Kaempfert record, it reminds me of those Christmases nearly 60 years ago with the smell of a real pine tree and a real coal fire and roasting chestnuts......oh and the Woolworths tree lights in different shapes....12 on a string.

js1024 IMG 20230107 203118

 The cover is a bit tatty but the record is near mint. 1963 on the label.

 
Posted : 08/01/2023 3:22 pm
absinthe_dude
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I have found, without exception, that first (or very early) pressings of Genesis albums from the 70s are significantly better than later ones. And it's specifically important to get UK pressings in most cases too.

 

Biggest case in point is their 1970 offering, Trespass and it's 1971 followup Nursery Cryme. These sold in low numbers so getting hold of a "pink scroll label" original is getting very difficult. I lucked into Trespass circa 1989 when people thought they were upgrading to CD and dumped whole record collections en-masse to record shops. Nursery Cryme took me another 35 years to source one at a price I was willing to pay.

 

But compared to the mid 70s and 80s pressings, and to the CDs prior to the (IMO bad) 2008 remasters....it's night and day. The original LPs sound clear, bright, balanced, full of life. Even John Mayhew's drums don't sound tooooo bad. A later pressing of Trespass has the drums sounding like poor Mayhew is hitting wet paper bags with his sticks....and only the gods know what went wrong with the Nursery Cryme tapes because it sounds like someone has whacked a tone control down. No headroom, treble sounds muffled, even Peter Gabriel's vocals are wooly. The remaster does bring back the clear, bright sound but reduces the dynamic range compared to the 1971 pressing. Thereafter the difference is a bit less until you get to The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, for which someone seems to have removed the bass for the later editions. One has to watch out though because the very first pressings have a dodgy side 4....found that out the hard way...

 

Conversely, Supertramp's Crime Of The Century has never sounded better than a modern analogue remaster I picked up in 2016. 

 

Thinking of names for the stuff.....we just called them records in my youth (80s). Occasionally LP to distinguish from a 45. Some time in the 90s I heard people begin to call them "vinyl records" and then "vinyl". The term "vinyls" does grate with me, but at least youngsters are buying them. I have an office turntable, and working in a school as I have for 24 years it's been interesting to see kids' reactions. It's gone from utter lack of knowledge of what a record is, to mild curiosity and the assumption that I am mad....to "Sir, what vinyl have you got today" when a 12x12 package is waiting for me at reception. I'm actually somewhat cool. And it is gratifying when a 14 year old boy comes into my office singing When The Levee Breaks.

 
Posted : 14/09/2023 2:23 pm
sideband
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I've just found my original LP of David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars (was it really 1972)?? I knew it was around somewhere and finally found it amongst my wife's LP's......tucked in with 'The Osmonds'!! (We don't share quite the same taste)!! I've cleaned it and given it a whirl and it sounds superb. I'll transfer it to CD and then I can play it in the car.

 
Posted : 18/09/2023 6:44 pm
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Posted by: @absinthe_dude

I lucked into Trespass circa 1989 when people thought they were upgrading to CD and dumped whole record collections en-masse to record shops.

This was happy hunting time for me. All of a sudden vinyl was out and I picked up some nice LPs from the local charity shops which expanded my collection greatly. On the same day I found original cast/soundtrack recordings of My Fair Lady and South Pacific. The latter film I had seen several times in various local flea pits with my mother with whom it was a favourite. We had a cheap 'cover' version on the Society label which didn't feature all the songs so a friend lent her the 'official' one to play. I remember the LP cover with its colour booklet insert featuring stills from the film so was delighted when I found a pristine item complete with insert for either 50p or a quid.

At this time I was able to gain many albums that had been long out of my reach in my pocket money days. Some 'always wanted' LPs I bought when I was first at work but these were the later pressings that were then availble new in the shops. Almost all of my Beatles pressings are later ones and by this time were the stereo versions.

By the late 1980s vinyl pressings seemed to be made on increasingly flimsy material. My LP copy of Swing Out Sister's It's Better to Travel could be described as a floppy disc. I guess with the coming of the CD the record industry felt corners could be cut when producing what they saw as an old-fashioned and outgoing medium.

I remember some poor early CD versions of LPs. A Beach Boys one is particularly muddy. CDs are now at that point where LPs were circa 1990. Along with DVDs the local charity shops put them out on trestle tables outside the shop. Typically they are three or sometimes five for a pound. I rather think the shops don't mind if they are stolen so as to free up storage space for more saleable and profitable items.

There is something about the tactile experience of an LP that isn't replicated with a CD. The act of taking it out of the sleeve, careful handling and cleaning, placing the stylus on the record and then settling back to read the sleeve notes that unlike CD booklets don't need a loupe to read. And, of course, two sides which meant a considered 'part one' and 'part two' arrangement of tracks which was no longer required with a CD.

 

Nick

 
Posted : 19/09/2023 9:23 am
Pye Man
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Posted by: @sideband

I've just found my original LP of David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars (was it really 1972)?? I knew it was around somewhere and finally found it amongst my wife's LP's......tucked in with 'The Osmonds'!!

Ahhh 1972.

Amongst the girls at the local high school it was either David Cassidy or Donny Osmond though there was a minority following of the Jackson Five. I remember them avidly reading their Jackie magazines on the regular bus service we used to get to school. (With one exception our local selective schools were all single sex and were a town away so the bus service provided a tantalising opportunity for socialising which, if you were lucky might continue at the occasional Saturday disco in a local church hall!)

I was never a Bowie fan but there was a good following as several boys and girls sported bog brush haircuts. And, of course, there was Marc Bolan and T Rex.

I bought Rod Stewart's Never a Dull Moment when it came out in the summer. This has an interesting cover with the record retrieved from the top and flaps front and back to reveal colour photographs. The outer covers feature a splendid art deco style illustration which, if the back flap is turned upwards, is seen to be continuous.

1972 - happy days of youth and an opening world...

 

Nick

 
Posted : 19/09/2023 9:57 am
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