Share:
Notifications
Clear all

Pye T20 Radio

Page 1 / 2
 
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Very lucky to pick this example of a 4 valve plus rectifier Superhet receiver from a local hospice care shop last week, the cabinet looks in badly scratched condition with the back panel broken in several pieces and a missing tuning knob.
This set looks to date from 1934 from the penciled date and signature that occurs in several places on the IFT cases. The radio has two separate parts, the upper power supply and lower radio chassis which has some mild surface rust mostly on the removable plate that holds the scale glass. The wire that drives the tuning pointer is missing along with the pointer itself.
To make a change I decided to tackle the cabinet first on this set. Using 150 grit wet and dry on a hard block the old finish came off very well with almost all the scratches being in the old coating, next step is to decide on a finish for it although I suspect it had a lacquer / varnish originally.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 13/01/2016 12:17 pm
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered

Are you sure it says 1934, Stephen? My recollection of the T20 is that it's 1936 (I provided the Radiomuseum catalogue picture of it) - in 1934 Pye were still producing "Rising Sun" sets...

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/01/2016 12:36 pm
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

The scale is more like 1935 -1936, quite like one Philips model actually.

I wonder is it similar chassis to an early Ever Ready? Many Lissen / Ever Ready from 1935 to 1938 (I think) at least used the same metal work of chassis as Pye sets (from Pye), and even same valve lineup. As to how much actual building Pye did on the chassis, I don't know. The Lissen and Ever Ready brands often same insides on a different box, some models even a different knob layout by using an auxilary plate on the Ever Ready version.

It should look and sound well when restored.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/01/2016 12:57 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

I agree and was only going on all three of the dated signatures on the chassis I have, the one shown on the radio museum is a Pye TP/AC or at least the cabinet is. The T20 has the defined three stage veneer as shown below.
It threw me for a while as I suspected mine was a TP/AC initially, but subtle variations in the circuit led me to belive it was not so searched for a better fit. The T20 is a perfect match apart from the dates on the Pye sheet.

Another interesting feature is the GEC Neon Tuneon Indicator, three pin tube driven from dc though ?

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 13/01/2016 1:01 pm
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

Hi Stephen
That is a lovely looking cabinet now, nice job.
The 1936 date is the date that the Trader and Broadcaster service information was printed, I expect that was used as the reference. But who knows, they may have been a couple of years late in producing the service information.
When did that style of licence label come out?
Great set to have.
Mike

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 8:03 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered

Unless it's had bits swapped out of it, my catalogues and other references date that set to 1936. As I said - in 1934 Pye were still making the 'Rising Sun' sets and stylistically, it's too far away from the styles of the period to be 1934.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 9:52 am
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

I agree totally that the signatures on the cans are from something else earlier, interestingly also I have found various other names on parts inside although nothing with any more dates, on the inside left side is a name "Madie T20"

Would this cabinet have had a high gloss,satin or matte finish ?

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/01/2016 11:35 am
Hartley118
(@hartley118)
Busy V-Ratter Deactivated Account

I have a Pye T10, which presumably preceded the T20. Here's a picture - the family resemblance to the T20 is clear, with the Art Deco hint of ziggurat having replaced the rising sun. This is the radio that I grew up with as a child - memories of Uncle Mac, Children's Hour, and much later on Radio Lux with Jack Jackson etc! It still just about plays, wet smoothing electrolytics, Tuneon and all, but is currently awaiting proper restoration. It used to feed a network of 3 extension speakers. In common with other Pye sets of that generation, the design thoughtfully includes provision for unplugging the main speaker when extension(s) are in use.

Relevant to this thread is the fact that it still has the owner's half of the warranty card inside, signed by my father and dated May 1936. Some 10 years ago, I exhibited the set at a technical history event in Cambridge, and a retired Pye employee remembered testing T10 sets. He told me they came out of the factory in 1935. I guess that would fit with them being in dealers' shops in 1936.

As far as I remember, the cabinet never had a high gloss finish - more like semi-matt. I'm currently working out how best to restore it, and get rid of the various scratches it's acquired during life in various sheds over the years

Martin

BVWS Member

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 1:03 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Very nice set, always fancied one with 4 wavebands from that era. If its like mine with regard to the scratches (looked like concrete block had been dragged over it) they did come out very well. I did not take a picture of the top sadly before the sanding, it was very ugly.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/01/2016 1:27 pm
Paul_RK
(@paul_rk)
Reputable V-Ratter Deactivated Account

I'd have to agree with other observations on the date, and hence the very curious dates of the internal signatures! The Trader's 'Receiver Specifications and Prices 1935-1940', a contemporary publication which very often includes month and year of release for new models, has the T20 as June 1936 (and the T10 as January '36).

Paul

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 1:42 pm
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

Hi Martin
I use Danish oil on sets which only have minor surface scratches. I rub it in and the scratches disappear. Then rub it off again with a clean cloth. I have also used dilute varnish in the same way to the same effect. It can even seep in under where it has started to lift.
It save having to scrape it all off and keeps the original polish or lacquer.

Mike

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 5:21 pm
Hartley118
(@hartley118)
Busy V-Ratter Deactivated Account

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the Danish Oil suggestion. I did actually buy some a few weeks ago on the strength of your recommendation. I need to give it a try. If it works on this set, it'll work on anything! I guess that it's sufficiently restrained in its action not to have an irreversible effect.

One of the reasons I've never got around to stripping the cabinet is that it has a rather special gold PYE logo on top (pictured). Although Pye had abandoned the 'rising sun' for the speaker grille (maybe the T10 was the first?), they had at that stage retained the design for the logo. I need to treat it in a way that hides the scratches but retains the print.

I find that one of the challenges of our hobby is that almost every piece of kit goes through a phase where it ceases to be of general everyday use, but isn't valued at the time. If it then doesn't actually go in the skip, it gets consigned to a shed or garage where it inevitably gets neglected, cracked, scratched etc., making eventual restoration more of a challenge than if we'd valued it in the first place. In the case of my T10, it was a workshop radio for many years from the early 1960s and certainly shows it!

Martin

BVWS Member

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 6:22 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Mine had that logo( almost obliterated ), it was going to be future question.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/01/2016 6:30 pm
Hartley118
(@hartley118)
Busy V-Ratter Deactivated Account

Hi Stephen,

I'm happy to send you a hi-res photo of the logo, but I'm rather interested to know where you'd go from there.

I'm sure there'll be members who have a much better version of it - with fewer scratches. Though I could improve it with a Photoshop job. Wish I could Photoshop the whole cabinet!

Martin

BVWS Member

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 7:40 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Hi Martin, My initial thoughts were to trace it, then cut oout using a craft scalpel. Then position on finished surface and roller over with gold paint.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/01/2016 8:29 pm
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

The scratches will still be there but the oil fills the minute pores which make the scratch stand out.
It worked a treat on my KB HR10 and quite a few others.
Mike

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2016 8:45 pm
Terry
(@terrykc)
Famed V-Ratter Rest in Peace

Hi Martin, My initial thoughts were to trace it, then cut oout using a craft scalpel. Then position on finished surface and roller over with gold paint.

Stephen, I took Martin's picture and pasted into Microsoft Paint, the used the dropper tool to sample the colour. I then drew a simple disc which looks reassuringly gold!

So, why not recreate the logo in a suitable drawing package - if you haven't got anything sophisticated, PAINT.net is free and, unlike the MS offering, allows you to create layers - trace out the logo on a second layer (you should be able to do this much more accurately than cutting a 1:1 stencil because you can work on a very large scale and correct any errors easily) - then save just the new layer.

You should then be able to print the result onto water-slide transfer film.

When all else fails, read the instructions

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2016 11:53 am
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

These instructions are taken from the page in the following link, http://www.craftycomputerpaper.co.uk/.L ... -LAZ1M.htm

"Use Laser Transfer Foils to add a great metallic finish to any craft project.
This has to be the easiest method to get stunning glittery results every time using a laser printer or photocopier.

You don't need to use any special kind of paper and you don't have to add the foil straight after printing.
Use any black image to transfer foil to the surface. Watch the video to see how easy and effective it is.

How does it work?
Choose any black image, the blacker the better. Print the images off using any paper and through
any kind of laser printer of copier. Cut out a piece of foil slightly larger than the design and place on top of your print.
Make sure you have the shiny side facing upwards. Lay a piece of paper over your project and then run it through a laminating machine set on high heat. You can at this stage use an iron instead of a laminating machine.
When using an iron you will need to set it to low heat as it transfers the foil very quickly and if it is too hot the foil will not stick properly.

Once the paper has been laminated or ironed you will see that it is sticking to the black part of the image.
Peel off the foil to reveal your glittering creation."

My comment;
It may be possible to print the black image on a laser waterslide and then iron on the gold, it may be best to check with the supplier.

I think Michael W has done this with white print.

Mike

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2016 12:49 pm
Anonymous
(@anonymous)
Illustrious V-Ratter Deactivated Account

Hi Stephen
Is the cloth you have used for the speaker grill a gold effect, what did you use, where did you get it.
I have been after some fine mesh gold coloured cloth for some of my vintage KB's
Thanks
Mike

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2016 12:59 pm
freya
(@freya)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Gerry Horrox at Crowthorne tubes some left on a roll, its not a perfect match but looks great. Its gold bronze black slight pattern.(not fixed yet)

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 15/01/2016 1:07 pm
Page 1 / 2