Share:
Notifications
Clear all

RCA Broadcast news Magazine - No. 77 Color (sic) TV in 1954

 
Brian Cuff
(@briancuff)
Noble V-Ratter Rest in Peace

During my clearout, I have re-discovered my copy of this historic magazine issue where RCA described in detail, their incredibly clever compatible system which allowed the existing monochrome transmission channels/system to carry the additional data required for faithful colour rendition.

It must be remembered that RCA were starting from scratch and had to "invent or develop" every piece of equipment required for this mammoth task. It is really well worth Googling for the magazine as there are several scanned versions available on line. The quality of the publication and scans is amazing with the printing quality of the original magazine second to none.

This brings me to a very interesting point about "private" libraries in the truest sense, i.e. the ones which contain books! The web has totally changed the requirements when it comes to storing information. "It's all on the web somewhere" is very easy to say but it is now becoming true. Wen I Googled the RCA magazine for the first time, I got about 4 hits, each with a very good scan of the complete magazine and in good quality - what's the point in having an original copy of the magazine unless it's for purely acquisitive reasons?

A really good example of this is when a new set comes up for restoration in a member's workshop - when there's no service info already in the electronic library, then Chris or Stan very kindly dig out the magazine/book wherein lies the information and it is scanned and uploaded - yet fewer reasons to hold onto the original, very heavy, paper source material.

Enough of my ramblings! I seem to be getting more and more verbose in my old age - What do you guys think about the death of books? Answers written on a £20 note and addressed to me.

Forum Memorial

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 07/03/2017 9:33 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Illustrious V-Ratter Registered

As someone who has an extensive dead tree library, I far prefer it. Books boot up instantly, don't crash and aren't subject to data corruption. They don't need a power supply either. Safe to read in bed, by a swimming pool or on an aircraft.

Some time ago I was asked why I had such an extensive collection of cassettes - "but you can download everything!" was the cry. To which my response was "if there's an Internet download of 55 010 coming through the brickyards in August 1978, or the conversations of my family at my parents' silver wedding anniversary party in 1977, point me at it."

To say that "it's all out there" is nonsense - for example, scan quality varies enormously; comparing the sheer quality of Stan's work with a lot of others speaks volumes.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/03/2017 10:21 am
Lloyd
(@lloyd)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

I'll agree, you can't beat paper copies of things! I much prefer to have service manuals in paper form, even if they are downloaded from the net, I'll print it off (when there's ink in the printer..doh_gif).

As my workshop PC is quite slow, it takes a lot of time out of a restoration scrolling from one page to another multiple times. I like to have access to each page quickly and easily, and if you have had the misfortune to try using Windows 10 recently, you'll fully understand it doesn't do 'quickly' or 'easily' at all!

I'd love to one day have a big house with it's own library...

Regards,

Lloyd.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/03/2017 1:00 pm
occiput
(@occiput)
Trusted V-Ratter Registered

Cathovisor said
As someone who has an extensive dead tree library, I far prefer it. Books boot up instantly, don't crash and aren't subject to data corruption.

Having been the victim of data loss due to a hard drive failure (my ex-employer's useless ICT department seemed to think that RAID was something that happened to banks, and therefore of no interest to them), I'm with Cathovisor on this one.

There is another aspect as well.  I would be the first to concede that this may simply be a reflection of the state of being a senile old fool who was brought up on books, but I find the paper versions of diagrams and instructions significantly easier to follow than those presented on-screen, with the notable, and so far about the only, exception of the sectionalised ones presented in the later RATS books.

Standards of presentation vary, of course: some manufacturers can perhaps be most charitably described as clearly being under the impression that their kit is never known to go wrong, and it is therefore unnecessary to put much effort into supporting the poor sap charged with fixing it.  At the other end of the spectrum, if you've ever had the good fortune to use circuit diagrams drawn by Ampex or, dare I say it, the BBC, you'll know what the gold standard looks like.

709379

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/03/2017 1:43 pm
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

Data loss could be a problem for either paper or digital data and it could be argued that is is easier to safe guard digital than paper. What I like about the digital versions is the ability to search quickly for a subject through many editions of magazines or through a book if the data is catalogued correctly, see for example.  http://www.americanradiohistory.com this website for long lost magazines is exceptional. I would not to store and look after a physical paper library of that size yet it fits digitally in approximately 1.2 TB, which by today's storage standards is quite small.

I find reading the information easy, perhaps that's due to using a tablet not a computer screen and if it's a large circuit there is the easy ability to print it out if it makes life easier.

We are all different, if paper is better for your tasks and you have the ability to store and care for it then that's good, for me it's not an option I either want or could have.

Its not all online, never will be but neither will any collection of what ever type of media have it all available.

A problem with online is the possibility that the host goes offline permanently, but if I never had or likely to have a paper copy I am in no different a position. I tend to try and keep any I download if there's a chance I may need it for reference but general magazine reading I don't bother.

Just downloaded RCA Broadcast News 77 for later readingthumb_gif

Frank

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/03/2017 2:42 pm