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1979 Philips VR2022  

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crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin

Today I was fortunate to get a Philips 2000, what a beast, bought from the original owner with 24 tapes packed with period programmes and adverts. It also came with the instructional tape and the manuals.

https://www.radios-tv.co.uk/philips-vr2022-video-2000/

I'd not come across the 2000 format before only VHS and Betamax so it was a revelation to see the tapes and that they are two sided. I also got a box of 40 VHS tapes from the owner, again with all sorts of recordings.

It works, well vision does giving a very good picture on my rack monitor but main fault, no sound just a pop,pop,pop,pop, pop to be heard. VCR's are not my forte so was wondering if anyone out there has some ideas to help. I'm chuffed to bits it almost working, it would be so nice to have the sound back and a working VCR to complement the old CTV collection.

At the time of its launch Video 2000 offered several innovative features unmatched by the competing formats VHS and Betamax:

    • Only half of the magnetic tape is scanned by a helical scanner during each side pass. The cassette can then be flipped over to use the other half of the tape, thus doubling playing time.
    • The tape is totally enclosed when not in use. Unlike competing formats that have spaces in the cassette for the tape loading mechanism to be inserted, thus exposing the delicate magnetic tape surface, VCCs had a retractable sheath that covers such space. The sheath is retracted as a tape is inserted into the machine and only then can the tape cover be raised to fully expose the tape.
    • Because of its Dynamic Track Following (DTF) technology (involving an advanced, movable video head tip), by design V2000 does not require a video tracking control (however, Grundig's model 1600 lacked DTF).
    • All V2000 VCRs sport an auto-rewind function (later matched by VHS and Betamax)
    • Dynamic Noise Suppression to reduce tape hiss on the audio track.
    • Provision of a data track alongside the video track
    • channel selection and timer programming are undertaken by a 0-9 numeric keypad

Thanks to DTF, V2000 is able to play both fields of the image in still frame mode, providing full vertical resolution whereas VHS and Betamax could only reproduce one field, giving only half of the normal vertical resolution. A real advantage of DTF on all but the very first V2000 models is the ability to provide picture search without noise bars across the screen, a feature domestic VHS or Betamax machines were only ever able to approach by introducing complex multi-head drums.

vc1
vc2
vc3
vc4

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Quote
Posted : 27/11/2015 7:22 pm
Topic Tags
Jamie
(@jskinner97)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

The sound head is mounted seperatly usually near the beginning of the tape feed spool It may just need a clean using some isoprop or even Alcohol Hand Cleaner.

This may help a little bit http://www.gregselectronics.com/cleanvcr.html
EDIT:
A quick Google tells us this "There is a NiCd battery on the control logic board. It's gone short circuit, will have leaked or at the very least outgassed, and might cause all sorts of erroneous operation. " http://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/show ... hp?t=60588 May also help?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 7:32 pm
crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin

Scrub that! Old crusty was suffering from twonkitis 

I was working on the assumption the recorded Live Aid tape was OK.... err no! Just tried another tape with some Cagney & Lacey, the sound is working fine. Just tried a few other tapes and they work OK too.

That's my evening/weekend sorted, I'm going to plough my way through these tapes watching all the old recordings/advert/news and forget its 2015.

So looks like I've been a spongy git and got myself a good working machine. Looking inside through the tape slot, I notice there are pulleys and drive cords not belts. If that's true then that will go a long way to explaining why this still runs. My other machines just have black goo splodges where the belts once were.

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ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 7:55 pm
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

Good news to hear, Chris. I always thought those machines embodied what domestic video should have become. However, we now have the sanity of the hard drive..

Any thoughts about capturing the content onto modern media? These days the interest (for me, anyway) is often in the adverts...!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 9:06 pm
hamid_1
(@hamid_1)
Active V-Ratter Registered

Wow ... a WORKING Philips Video 2000!

I've had a few of these over the years, but never had one that stayed working for more than a day or two.

They were introduced in 1980. Cutting-edge technology at the time, though I think they were too complex and unreliable. Even setting the timer and tuning in the channels is quite a task.

These Philips machines were also sold as Pye, ITT and Bang And Olufsen Beocord. Grundig also made Video 2000 recorders to their own design. Later models had stereo sound and a long play feature, giving up to 16 hours recording per tape (2x8 hours per side). Much more information at http://v2000.palsite.com/

Definitely copy off any interesting material from those tapes - I can guarantee it won't stay working for very long, based on my own experience. DVD recorder with hard drive is my favourite method for doing this.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 9:37 pm
Doz
 Doz
(@doz)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

You could always tell a visionhire machine... it only had the centre screw holding the base plate on .... :bba

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 10:57 pm
sideband
(@sideband)
Famed V-Ratter Moderator

Great machine Chris! I had the next one up, the 2023 for about 10 years until the heads became too difficult to source. Yes all direct drive, not a belt in sight. I attended a three day training course on these when they first came out...and got a free machine as a home trial. After two years it went wrong and Philips changed it for the 2023 and that sat under various TV's for the next 10 years with only a few minor repairs.

I still reckon they were the best VCR out there........

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/11/2015 11:28 pm
crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin

Four hours later and its still playing. Good to hear my suspicion confirmed that its direct drive.

The only issue I've noticed and it could just be the age of the tapes, is the picture bounces occasionally. As I've said above I've no experience with videos so not sure whether its tape or machine. I notice there's very little user controls unlike the Fergy's which have tracking adjustment and the tuner controls etc.

It is in superb condition and has obviously been looked after, built like a tank a feels like its just as heavy. The previous owner said it cost them £30 p.m and the payment plan lasted many, many years. No idea what they cost when new. In the paperwork was also a Redifussion TV manual and a Mullard colour TV guarantee, no idea if that was around the same time or later. Perhaps I should go back and ask if they still have the TV ferreted away too.

vc5

Crusty's Collection: Read the repair blogs
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ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 12:01 am
sideband
(@sideband)
Famed V-Ratter Moderator

No idea what they cost when new.

I seem to recall it was upwards of £500 depending on the model.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 12:24 am
crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin

Found the service manual on-line, its now in the library.

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ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 1:12 am
Nuvistor
(@nuvistor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

From what I recall but I never saw one, the 2000 VCR had dynamic tracking of some sort, no need for a tracking control.

VCR's were just getting in their stride when I left the trade so my experience is very limited, fixed a few early VHS and Beta machines but not that many. I owned a Panasonic VHS VCR from the middle 80's to late 90's, only fault it had was an o/c reservoir cap. The same recorder was available in a Philips version.

The Mullard guarantee, filled a few of those out in the 1970's but claimed on very few of them, still they gave the customer confidence in the CRT. The ones I did make a claim, Mullard never quibbled, they had a dept in Heywood near Manchester, take the CRT in and they tested it and handed a replacement over there and then.

Perhaps I am wandering off topic.

Frank

Frank

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 10:06 am
malcscott
(@malcscott)
Noble V-Ratter Registered

Hi Chris, i have just scraped one of these machines due to drum failiure. You are welcome to all of the PCB,s i have salvaged, Malc.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 10:41 am
crustytv
(@crustytv)
Vrat Founder Admin

Hi Malc,

Yes please, that would certainly give peace of mind knowing I had some spares in stock. 👍 

Now just for a further insurance policy, the hunt for a spare head commences. It may take months or years but I'm sure something will eventually crop up.

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ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 11:17 am
Cathovisor
(@cathovisor)
Famed V-Ratter Registered

From what I recall but I never saw one, the 2000 VCR had dynamic tracking of some sort, no need for a tracking control.

They did, and it worked in much the same way as professional VTRs like the Ampex VPR2 did. The heads were mounted on piezo bimorphs which were in a servo all of their own to get the maximum RF off the tape. See http://www.google.co.uk/patents/US4544967 for the general principle.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 12:21 pm
Niall
(@niall)
Reputable V-Ratter Registered

When our family decided to get our first VCR the choice was VHS, Beta or V2000. I researched it and reckoned that V2000 was the best choice from a technical point of view, but my parents went for VHS in the end. I think the signs were there even then that VHS was going to be the dominant format. V2000 wouldn't necessarily have been a bad choice as most of what we ended up doing was off air recording, although the cost of the tapes might have been a factor when VHS tapes became cheap to buy. I remember the dynamic head alignment being a feature.

An interesting lesson for me that being the technically best system doesn't automatically mean success in the market, which was reinforced later by the BSB / Sky thing and arguably PCs. I tend to think of this as the US approach of aiming at "good enough to do the job" rather than technical perfection at a cost in lead time, complexity and reliability. Perhaps one of the secrets of Amstrad's success in their heyday, where Sinclair had tried a similar approach but usually ended up with "not quite good enough to be useable".

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/11/2015 12:21 pm
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